Starts & Finishes

Hardware newI have a habit of starting many things at once.  Case in point: the 8 books on my nightstand at varying stages of doneness.

It’s not that I don’t finish them (I do), or that I become disinterested (I don’t).  It’s just that there are many things I want to get my hands into: things to paint! plants to plant! And I want to start all of it now.

One of these was a kitchen renovation I took on last year.  While I didn’t do anything structural, it was pretty involved, and it’s still only about 85% done.  (Did I paint the lower cabinets gray yet? Nope. Will I? Maybe). And I’ve been beating myself up over the fact that it’s not done, focused on the list of to-do’s to get me there.  

That’s something I’ve always grappled with:  the list mentality that goes along with any project.  Too often I’ve caught myself thinking “I must finish XYZ and check these tasks off before I can relax.”  

But I’m learning to be in the moment and focus on the “process of doing”, not just the end result.  Chalk it up to making bigger life changes or a heightened awareness of the swift passage of time (yikes).  I’m trying to be mindful of where I am this minute – instead of focusing on some imaginary finish line.

As it turns out, most tasks in this reno have been a blast:  picking finishes, accessorizing, styling.  Paying attention to these smaller moments is where the magic is (in kitchens, and in life).  So that’s where I am, enjoying the decisions I’ve made, big and small, that have made this space mine.

Some highlights below:

1. The FloorsFloor 1Ah yes, my heavy-duty, smooth and buttery encaustic clay tile floor.  It may be a favorite element, and what likely made this project stretch on for months vs. weeks (it took me awhile to choose a pattern).

The motif is baked into the top clay layer, so after years of wear, the pattern won’t wear away.   I chose the Atlas II from Cement Tile Shop because it feels part farmhouse, part modern.  The charcoal and milk colorway paired with a white grout imparts a faded-out look at the seams that I love.

2. Area RugMaker:S,Date:2017-10-20,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y

This guy!  $30 at Urban Outfitters.  Every space needs a black accent for drama and depth.  This also hides all manner of spills and sins.

3.  Backsplash Tile

Speaking of, I was drawn to this ceramic tile because I was wanted a clean and minimal graphic like subway tile, but a bit more unique.  This 2″ hexagon from Home Depot is a nod to the asphalt blocks I see on my runs (walks?) along the Brooklyn Promenade, a little something inspired by the neighborhood.

4.  Greenery

Plants simply bring  warmth to a space in my opinion.  Succulents are nice on kitchen counters because they’re tight and their leafiness won’t get in the way of cooking.  And brightly colored planters allow for a color scheme that can change with the seasons.Maker:S,Date:2017-10-20,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y

5.  Hardware

This is where I got to add some “jewelry” to my design.  I chose the simple dimpled Mid-Century Knob for the cabinets, and the squared-off Greenwood Pull for the drawers, both from Schoolhouse Electric.  I love that they’re handmade in the US from recycled brass.  The faucet is the Trinsic in champagne bronze from Delta, but the “wet bar” version, which works better in smaller spaces.  It’s also quote sexy for something rated so highly for longevity and functionality (note: it is totally normal to rank the sex appeal of a faucet).

6.  Accents / Kitsch / Doo-dads

Keeping in line with the brass, I added some character with a few small brass accents.  I know the brass trend may have peaked, but I personally cannot get enough of it. You could say these additions speak to two of my favorite kitchen activities:  crafting cocktails and popping open a brew. Maker:S,Date:2017-10-20,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y The plaque is from a road trip to that took me and a few friends through Malibu a few years ago.  I may mount it on the island to make a real “I’m on a ship!” statement, but for now it rests in a book nook.

7. Custom Grill

Alright, last brass thing (promise).  This custom grill covers a non-functionining heater and replaces and old, heavy steel grate.  This picks up on some of the graphic qualities of the floor but in an old-school Grecian pattern.

Grill

8.  Wood Elements – utensil holder, cutting boards, countertops

To balance some of the stark white and harder surfaces like the white wood cabinets and Caesarstone countertops, I used a 2″ thick walnut for the island surface, and echoed the finish in the form of a teak utensil holder and natural wood cutting boards.  The cutting boards are in constant rotation and do double-duty, covering the electrical sockets when not in use.

 

So, this is all she wrote for now, the highlights from a journey still in progress.  There could be more updates coming your way in the form of new accessories and details, but hopefully I’ll be too busying enjoying them to report back.

RESOURCES:

UrbanOutfitters – area rug

Anthropologie – planter

Whisk – teak utensil holder

Malibu Farm – brass plaque

Delta – sink faucet

ArchGrille – custom grill

Schoolhouse Electric – cabinet hardware

Home Depot – Merola Hexagon Tile

Cement Tile Shop – floor tiles

PH Architectural Woodworks –  all custom cabinetry and millwork

Advertisements

Kitchen Aspiration

Kitchen Final Option

In my quest to post “polished pieces” and final design projects on this blog , I’ve gone months without a peep.  This is nonsense!

So today I present you with something at its beginning:  my kitchen.  When I moved here 3 years ago, I was charmed by its age.  Plenty of apartments I looked at had sleekly renovated kitchens and modern cabinetry, but they left me cold.  This place was different:  its kitchen hadn’t gone through any changes in 30+ years – for better or for worse.

Kitchen Before 1

Its white wood cabinets are decorated with branch-like pulls that are quirky and actually quite charming.  And the layout is nice.  But it’s ripe for an overhaul, so here we are.  Enter my renderings:

20160814_182955

The best way for me to imagine my space is to put pencil to paper.  While digital drawing tools are great, drafting lets me work out a scheme more organically.  So after drafting a few designs and a rough 3D perspective, I used watercolors to work through the different color and material options.

Kitchen Sketch 1

Painting out four different versions allowed me to get a broad stroke visual of how materials like wood, white granite and dark vs. lighter cabinetry would read in the space and work together (or potentially against each other).

I alternated between white or wood counters, charcoal finished lower and upper cabinets, and white subway tile with antique brass pulls and accents.  The renderings are by no means polished; I got scrappier as I went, quickly getting the color on the page to see the effect.

This helped me visualize potential fixtures and materials, which all nicely bridge the gap between modern and classic, with a nod to industrialism.

So I’m close to a winner:  in lieu of going monochromatic, I’m opting for an eclectic look: dark cabinets on the bottom to tie the space in with the rest of the apartment, with white on top. I’ve also heard wood top counters are high maintenance, so I’ll bring in that look with reclaimed wood paneling around the island, or with porcelain wood tile as the backsplash.

Kitchen option 3

So it’s go time.  But not quite yet:  I’m trying to enjoy the feeling of having made decisions!  Sometimes that’s just as much fun as the execution.

But nothing will be as fun as sitting at a new counter for the first time, rendering something new.